The Syrian Negotiating Commission welcomes the approval of the “Captagon 2” law

The Syrian Negotiating Commission welcomes the approval of the “Captagon 2” law

Apr 18 2024

ARK News… The Syrian Negotiation Commission has welcomed the approval of the "Caesar Syria Civilian Protection Act 2" by the U.S. House of Representatives, calling for robust mechanisms to hold the Syrian regime accountable "as a source of regional and international instability."

Badr Jamous, the head of the Syrian Negotiation Commission, stated in a Facebook post: "The cooperation with Syrian American community organizations has borne fruit, culminating in the outstanding diligent efforts that began years ago with the passage of the first Caesar Syria Civilian Protection Act in 2022, and now with the passage of the Caesar Syria Civilian Protection Act 2."

He added: "We commend the Syrian collective effort, which has always been deserving of our appreciation and respect, and is a wonderful expression of Syrians' determination towards their revolution's goals, and an indicator of their ability to succeed together."

Jamous continued: "We welcome this new law because it will contribute, along with other international and American measures, to curtail the Syrian regime's funding of its war and suppression of Syrians through its illicit drug trade, which has extended beyond Syria's geographic borders to become a threat to Arab, regional, and international security, by transforming Syria into a global drug-manufacturing and exporting state."

He urged the United States, the international community, and the United Nations to pressure the Syrian regime and its allies "to advance in the political transition process" and fully implement Resolution 2254 rigorously, "and then to establish strong mechanisms to hold it accountable as a source of regional and international instability."


The U.S. House of Representatives passed the "Caesar Syria Civilian Protection Act 2" on Tuesday, granting broad powers to the U.S. administration to hold the Syrian regime accountable for drug trafficking.

The bill received support from 410 members, opposed by 13 members, and complements the law passed at the end of 2022, which calls for a joint strategy among U.S. agencies to disrupt and dismantle drug production and trafficking networks associated with the Assad regime in Syria.

The law targets the Syrian regime, its associated networks, and anyone engaging in or benefiting from trafficking, manufacturing, or smuggling of drugs, regardless of nationality.

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